• Contact Info
Publications in VIVO
 

Dwyer, Michael Benjamin Instructor

Positions

Research Areas research areas

Research

research overview

  • Michael Dwyer is a political ecologist who studies the intersection of agrarian change, environmental politics and struggles over property formalization and development in Southeast Asia. He has conducted fieldwork in Laos and Cambodia on the legacies of Cold War conflict on contemporary rural development, the geography and policy tradeoffs of land titling, and land conflicts and property rights related to new infrastructure, large-scale land concessions, and carbon forestry/REDD+; he has also worked collaborative across the region on these and other land and natural resource-related governance issues in Indonesia, Myanmar and Viet Nam. Mike’s current work examines land governance debates in the context of large-scale investment in rural areas and efforts to “green” the economies of Southeast Asia.

keywords

  • political ecology, development studies, human geography, environmental governance, land politics and administration, Southeast Asia, regulation, forest policy, international climate policy

Publications

selected publications

Teaching

courses taught

  • ASIA 2852 - Contemporary Southeast Asia: Environmental Politics
    Primary Instructor - Fall 2018
    Examines globally pressing questions of environmental sustainability, regional inequality and development in the dynamic and heterogeneous landscapes of contemporary Southeast Asia. Focuses on interactions between histories of uneven development and contemporary debates over energy and infrastructure, food security, governance and access to land, forest and water-based resources. Same as GEOG 2852.
  • ASIA 4842 - Global Frontiers in Southeast Asia
    Primary Instructor - Spring 2018 / Spring 2019
    Uses the theme of the global frontier to examine and compare three key moments in the modern history of Southeast Asia: the colonial encounter, the rise of the modern territorial state, and the age of contemporary globalization. Examines case studies from earlier eras to analyze emerging global frontiers at the junction of state territoriality and transnational economic expansion. Same as GEOG 4842 and GEOG 5842.
  • GEOG 2092 - Advanced Introduction to Human Geography
    Primary Instructor - Spring 2018 / Spring 2019
    Provides a rigorous introduction to key analytical concepts of human geography - place, space, scale, regions, nature, landscapes and territory - while giving an overview of topics addressed in subfields including economic geography, political geography, cultural geography and development geography. Specific topics may vary slightly from semester to semester but will likely include borders and migration, maps, tourism, climate change and the Anthropocene, geopolitical conflict, development, urbanization, nationalism, gender, race, inequality and identity.
  • GEOG 2852 - Contemporary Southeast Asia: Environmental Politics
    Primary Instructor - Fall 2018
    Examines globally pressing questions of environmental sustainability, regional inequality and development in the dynamic and heterogeneous landscapes of contemporary Southeast Asia. Focuses on interactions between histories of uneven development and contemporary debates over energy and infrastructure, food security, governance and access to land, forest and water-based resources. Same as ASIA 2852.
  • GEOG 3422 - Political Ecology
    Primary Instructor - Spring 2018
    Introduces students to political ecology, an influential approach to understanding society-environment relationships. Explores issues including different philosophies of nature and wilderness, the politics of conservation, causes of environmental degradation, environmental conflict and indigenous ecological knowledge. Recommended prerequisite: GEOG 1972.
  • GEOG 3682 - Geography of International Development
    Primary Instructor - Fall 2018
    Compares and contrasts global characteristics and processes of development, emphasizing the developing countries of the world. Integrates theories of development, specific development topics, and case studies to explore the problems of development. Recommended prerequisite: GEOG 1962 or GEOG 1972 or GEOG 1982 or GEOG 1992 or GEOG 2092.
  • GEOG 4173 - Research Seminar
    Primary Instructor - Fall 2018
    Examines the nature of research and develops pregraduate skills for geographic research, emphasizing problem definition, methods, sources, data interpretation, and writing. Recommended for students pursuing honors.
  • GEOG 4842 - Global Frontiers in Southeast Asia
    Primary Instructor - Spring 2018 / Spring 2019
    Uses the theme of the global frontier to examine and compare three key moments in the modern history of Southeast Asia: the colonial encounter, the rise of the modern territorial state, and the age of contemporary globalization. Examines case studies from earlier eras to analyze emerging global frontiers at the junction of state territoriality and transnational economic expansion. Same as GEOG 5842 and ASIA 4842.
  • GEOG 4990 - Senior Thesis
    Primary Instructor - Spring 2018 / Summer 2018 / Fall 2018 / Spring 2019
    Offers thesis research under faculty supervision. May be repeated up to 6 total credit hours. Instructor consent required.
  • GEOG 5842 - Global Frontiers in Southeast Asia
    Primary Instructor - Spring 2018 / Spring 2019
    Uses the theme of the global frontier to examine and compare three key moments in the modern history of Southeast Asia: the colonial encounter, the rise of the modern territorial state, and the age of contemporary globalization. Examines case studies from earlier eras to analyze emerging global frontiers at the junction of state territoriality and transnational economic expansion. Same as GEOG 4842 and ASIA 4842.
  • GEOG 6402 - Seminar: Political Ecology
    Primary Instructor - Spring 2019
    Critically examines the politics of human-environment relationships across cultures and societies. Focuses on environmental degradation, change and management from the perspectives including political economy, cultural politics, STS and post structural theory. May be repeated up to 6 total credit hours.

Background

International Activities

Other Profiles