placeholder image
  • Contact Info
Publications in VIVO
 

Sutter, Paul Shriver Professor

Positions

Research Areas research areas

Research

research overview

  • Paul Sutter is an environmental historian whose research has focused on the American wilderness movement, southern environmental history, U.S. imperial environmental history, and other topics. He is currently working on tentatively titled “Pulling the Teeth of the Tropics: Environment, Disease, Race, and the U.S. Sanitary Program in Panama, 1904-1914,” interprets American expansion and imperial public health through the lens of environmental history.

keywords

  • environmental history

Publications

selected publications

Teaching

courses taught

  • HIST 1025 - American History since 1865
    Primary Instructor - Fall 2018 / Spring 2020
    Explores political, social and cultural changes in American life since Reconstruction. Focuses on shifting social and political relations as the U.S. changed from a nation of farmers and small-town dwellers to an urban, industrial society; the changing meaning of American identity in a society divided by ethnicity, race and class; and the emergence of the U.S. as a world power.
  • HIST 1800 - Introduction to Global History
    Primary Instructor - Fall 2019
    The first cornerstone course for history majors applies a broad perspective to the global past in order to illuminate how common historical patterns and processes, as well as unique elements, shaped the human experience. Using a thematic approach, all topical variations of this course highlight cross-cultural interactions among societies, and, when relevant, how historical processes that began centuries ago still impact the contemporary world. Topics will vary by section. Department enforced prerequisite: 3 hours of any history coursework.
  • HIST 4416 - Environmental History of North America
    Primary Instructor - Spring 2021
    Examines how people of North America, from precolonial times to the present, interact with, altered, and thought about the natural world. Key themes include Native American land uses; colonization and ecological imperialism; environmental impacts of food and agriculture; industrialization, urbanization and pollution; energy transitions; cultures of environmental appreciation; the growth of the conversation and environmental movements.
  • HIST 4930 - History Internship
    Primary Instructor - Spring 2018
    Matches selected students with supervised internships in professional archives research libraries, historical associations, and special projects. Interns apply their academic area specialty to their work in the field. Internships have a work and academic (reading and writing) component. May be repeated up to 6 total credit hours. Recommended prerequisite: completion of lower-level history coursework (for example HIST 1015 or HIST 1025).
  • HIST 5106 - Graduate Colloquium in United States History
    Primary Instructor - Fall 2020
    Students gain an acquaintance with major works in the field and discuss current issues of interpretation and methodology. May be repeated up to 9 total credit hours.
  • HIST 6410 - Readings in Environmental History
    Primary Instructor - Spring 2019
    Offers historical perspective on the complex and interdependent relationship between human social and cultural institutions and the natural world. Considers interdisciplinary methodologies incorporating history, biology, geography, law, and other disciplines. Formerly HIST 6417.
  • HIST 6950 - Master's Thesis
    Primary Instructor - Fall 2019 / Spring 2020 / Fall 2020 / Spring 2021
    -
  • HIST 7415 - Graduate Seminar in Modern United States History
    Primary Instructor - Spring 2018
    Introduces students to various research approaches and methods in modern U.S. historiography and requires them to produce a substantial and original research paper using both primary and secondary sources.

Background

awards and honors

International Activities

Other Profiles