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Boyd, Samuel L Assistant Professor

Positions

Research Areas research areas

Research

research overview

  • Sam Boyd researches the Bible through various critical methods and in light of wider historical contexts to understand both the production of these documents as well as their history of interpretation. His particular areas of research include the development of the Pentateuch, legal hermeneutics in the ancient Near East, language ideology in the ancient world, and ritual theory applied to biblical texts. He also has interests in archaeology, Semitic philology and linguistics, and Late Antiquity (Rabbinic biblical interpretation, Ethiopic Christianity, and the advent of Islam).

keywords

  • bible, hebrew bible, old testament, new testament, early judaism, early christianity, ancient near east, archaeology, semitic linguistics, philology, eastern syriac christianity, ethiopic christianity

Publications

selected publications

Teaching

courses taught

  • JWST 1900 - Introduction to the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament
    Primary Instructor - Fall 2019
    Examine the content of the Hebrew Bible and critical theories regarding its development. Explore the development of these texts, as well as their foundational role for rabbinic literature and the New Testament. Assess the enduring influence of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament in world literature and culture (such as in art and music). Same as RLST 1900.
  • JWST 2600 - Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
    Primary Instructor - Summer 2018 / Summer 2019 / Fall 2019
    Introduces literature, beliefs, practices, and institutions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, in historical perspective. Same as RLST 2600.
  • JWST 3150 - Jerusalem: The Holy City in History, Legend, and Religious Thought
    Primary Instructor - Spring 2020
    The history of Jerusalem and the stories that have given it prominence in the religious imagination continue to shape much of the world in which we live. In this class, we will survey approximately three millennia of the history of the city. We will ask methodological question, such as: What does it mean for a place to be conceived of as holy? How does this perceived holiness come about? What happens when holy places are destroyed and rebuilt? We will examine the biblical stories about Jerusalem not only as important sources themselves, but also for how they shape later religious traditions, specifically Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. As such, we will address what it means for the same place to be perceived as �holy� by differing, and often competing, groups. These contestations regarding Jerusalem will, then, allow us to engage issues of religious diversity and conflict both historically and in the present.
  • RLST 1900 - Introduction to the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament
    Primary Instructor - Fall 2019
    Examine the content of the Hebrew Bible and critical theories regarding its development. Explore the development of these texts, as well as their foundational role for rabbinic literature and the New Testament. Assess the enduring influence of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament in world literature and culture (such as in art and music). Same as JWST 1900.
  • RLST 2600 - Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
    Primary Instructor - Summer 2018 / Summer 2019 / Fall 2019
    Introduces literature, beliefs, practices, and institutions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, in historical perspective. Same as JWST 2600.
  • RLST 3150 - Jerusalem: The Holy City in History, Legend, and Religious Thought
    Primary Instructor - Spring 2020
    The history of Jerusalem and the stories that have given it prominence in the religious imagination continue to shape much of the world in which we live. In this class, we will survey approximately three millennia of the history of the city. We will ask methodological question, such as: What does it mean for a place to be conceived of as holy? How does this perceived holiness come about? What happens when holy places are destroyed and rebuilt? We will examine the biblical stories about Jerusalem not only as important sources themselves, but also for how they shape later religious traditions, specifically Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. As such, we will address what it means for the same place to be perceived as �holy� by differing, and often competing, groups. These contestations regarding Jerusalem will, then, allow us to engage issues of religious diversity and conflict both historically and in the present.
  • RLST 4820 - Interdisciplinary Seminar on Religion
    Primary Instructor - Fall 2018
    Variable topics in religion, drawing from a variety of disciplines and methodologies as they shed light on specific traditions and issues. Recommended requisite: 6 credit hours of religious studies at any level or instructor consent. May be repeated up to 9 total credit hours as topics change. Same as RLST 5820.
  • RLST 5820 - Interdisciplinary Seminar on Religion
    Primary Instructor - Fall 2018
    Variable topics in religion, drawing from a variety of disciplines and methodologies as they shed light on specific traditions and issues. May be repeated up to 9 total credit hours as topics change. Same as RLST 4820.
  • RLST 6940 - Master's Candidate for Degree
    Primary Instructor - Fall 2019 / Spring 2020
    -
  • RLST 6945 - Portfolio: Non-Thesis Option
    Primary Instructor - Spring 2018 / Spring 2019 / Spring 2020
    Course work finished or in the last semester. May be repeated up to 4 total credit hours.
  • RLST 6950 - Portfolio: Thesis Option
    Primary Instructor - Fall 2019 / Spring 2020
    -

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