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Carpenter, Kristen Ann Council Tree Professor

Positions

Research Areas research areas

Research

research overview

  • Professor Carpenter's research focuses on the legal claims of indigenous peoples, especially with respect to issues of property, religion, culture, and human rights. Her articles have been published in the Yale Law Journal, California Law Review, UCLA Law Review, Fordham Law Review and others. Professor Carpenter is also active in pro bono work on American Indian cultural and religious freedoms.

keywords

  • american indian law, property, cultural property, law and religion, law and culture, human rights, indigenous peoples

Publications

selected publications

Teaching

courses taught

  • LAWS 6602 - Cultural Property Law
    Primary Instructor - Spring 2019
    Concerns domestic and International regulation of property that expresses group identity and experience. Organized around traditional categories of property (real, personal and intellectual), covers historic preservation, archeological resources, art and museum law, with attention to indigenous people's advocacy on burial sites, traditional lands, ceremonies, music, symbols, ethnobotany, genetic information and language. May satisfy upper-level writing requirement.
  • LAWS 6808 - LILAC Symposium Course: Leadership in Law and Community
    Primary Instructor - Fall 2018
    Addresses issues in law, community, and leadership, explored through multiple pedagogies in teaching and learning, in a symposium-style setting. After introductory classes on the theme of leadership in law and community, and related topics of professional responsibility and personal identity, social change, creative lawyering, the course will turn to spring service projects in law and community.
  • LAWS 7715 - Indigenous Peoples in International Law
    Primary Instructor - Fall 2018 / Fall 2019
    Studies developments in the substance and procedure of international human rights law pertaining to indigenous peoples, examining these developments through varying perspectives, doctrinal and political, pragmatic and critical. Students will become familiar with indigenous peoples' involvement in the human rights movement both before and after WWII, and corresponding developments in the United Nations, Organization of American States, and other institutions.
  • LAWS 8440 - Seminar: International Human Rights
    Primary Instructor - Spring 2018
    Exposes students to a variety of human rights issues and the responses by international institutions. In the fall, the seminar will meet for several sessions in a colloquium format, featuring guest speakers from around the world. In the spring semester, students will complete a paper that satisfies the law school's seminar writing requirement.

Background

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