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Beechy, Tiffany R. Associate Professor

Positions

Research Areas research areas

Research

research overview

  • Dr. Beechy's work currently focuses on formal experimentation in Anglo-Saxon England. Her research considers the relationship between form and meaning not only in poetry but in other kinds of texts and artifacts. Her current project involves the ways in which Anglo-Saxon writers and artists linked the idea of form to the concept of the 'Word made flesh' from the Book of John. The various forms the Word could take seem to have been understood as incarnational--the divine made visible. This understanding of the Word made flesh in verbal form constitutes a kind of 'incarnational poetics' that in fact provides a prehistory for the well documented formal experimentation of the late medieval period.

keywords

  • medieval poetry and poetics, poetics, linguistic theory, semiotics, Old English language and literature, Middle English language and literature, aesthetics, linguistic approaches to literature, manuscript studies, paleography, digital manuscript studies

Publications

selected publications

Teaching

courses taught

  • ENGL 2102 - Literary Analysis
    Primary Instructor - Fall 2018 / Summer 2019
    Provides a basic skills course designed to equip students to handle the English major. Emphasizes critical writing and the acquisition of basic techniques and vocabulary of literary criticism through close attention to poetry and prose.
  • ENGL 4003 - Introduction to Old English
    Primary Instructor - Fall 2018 / Fall 2019
    Introduces students to Old English, the ancient ancestor of Modern English (as Latin is the ancestor of Spanish and Italian, distinct from both). Course will focus on reading knowledge through grammar study and translation, and to a lesser extent on pronunciation. Provides basic parsing and translation skills and an introduction to the history, culture, and literature of early medieval Britain. Provides an introduction to grammar and to the history of the English language. Same as ENGL 5003.
  • ENGL 4013 - Intermediate Old English I
    Primary Instructor - Spring 2019
    Continues to develop skills in Old English reading and translation. Focuses on shorter canonical texts in verse and prose. Students will produce idiomatic translations for every class, write a midterm exam based on those translations, and write either a final exam or a final paper. Students will also memorize and present a short section of verse in the original language. Graduate students will read and present on secondary scholarship and produce original research. Same as ENGL 5013.
  • ENGL 5003 - Introduction to Old English
    Primary Instructor - Fall 2019
    Introduces students to Old English, the ancient ancestor of Modern English (as Latin is the ancestor of Spanish and Italian, distinct from both). Course will focus on reading knowledge through grammar study and translation, and to a lesser extent on pronunciation. Provides basic parsing and translation skills and an introduction to the history, culture, and literature of early medieval Britain. Provides an introduction to grammar and to the history of the English language. Same as ENGL 4003.
  • ENGL 5013 - Intermediate Old English I
    Primary Instructor - Spring 2019
    Continues to develop skills in Old English reading and translation. Focuses on shorter canonical texts in verse and prose. Students will produce idiomatic translations for every class, write a midterm exam based on those translations, and write either a final exam or a final paper. Students will also memorize and present a short section of verse in the original language. Graduate students will read and present on secondary scholarship and produce original research. Same as ENGL 4013.
  • ENGL 5029 - British Literature and Culture Before 1800
    Primary Instructor - Spring 2019
    Introduces graduate level study of medieval and early modern writing through the long eighteenth century. Emphasizes a wide range of genres, forms, historical background, and secondary criticism. Cultivates research skills necessary for advanced graduate study. Topics will vary. May be repeated up to 6 total credit hours.

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