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Diduch, Paul Jordan Instructor

Positions

Research Areas research areas

Research

research overview

  • Dr. Diduch's research is focused on issues in ancient Greek political philosophy, in addition to questions in epistemology and ethics. Dr. Diduch has published on Plato's Crito and Thucydides' History, and is currently working on a paper on Plato's Meno, which explores the pedagogic relationship between problems in moral philosophy and problems in epistemology (specifically, the problem of epistemic circularity). This paper has already received high praise for its novel argument linking the problems of virtue and knowledge together as matters of Socratic pedagogic priority. Dr. Diduch is also interested in relating current issues in epistemology, especially evolutionary epistemology, to Socratic philosophy and ancient Skepticism. Dr. Diduch has recently published an edited volume on the question of Socrates' philosophic philanthropy; and his long-term research goals include a book manuscript on Socrates' critique of ancient science.

keywords

  • philosophy, ancient philosophy, ancient political thought, Plato, Aristotle, history of political thought, science studies, moral and philosophical implications of modern science, philosophy of science, Darwinism, scientism, philosophical assumptions and implications of contemporary psychology and cognitive science,

Publications

Teaching

courses taught

  • ENES 1010 - Engineering, Ethics and Society
    Primary Instructor - Fall 2020 / Spring 2021
    Explores a wide variety of challenging and interesting humanistic themes (love, responsibility, ambition, etc.) in many forms (fiction, philosophy, plays, poetry, art, music, etc.). In small discussion-based classes, emphasizes the writing, public speaking and critical thinking skills needed to excel as a professional engineer. Fulfills College of Engineering writing requirement for first-year freshmen only. Formerly HUEN 1010.
  • ENES 2210 - Modern Science and Technological Society
    Primary Instructor - Fall 2020
    Explores challenges that engineering and science pose for society plus the ways that societies shape or impede science and engineering. Case studies range from contemporary issues (global warming, nuclear weapons, and genetic engineering) to classic cases (the execution of Socrates). Core texts in the Western Tradition supplement contemporary articles and films. Formerly HUEN 2210.
  • ENES 3100 - Seminar in Engineering, Ethics & Society
    Primary Instructor - Spring 2021
    Introduces students to foundational texts in personal ethics (from philosophy, literature, history, and the arts). Class discussion puts these texts into context for students preparing to enter careers in engineering and applied science.'Includes extensive writing. Fulfills the College of Engineering & Applied Science writing requirement.'Department prerequisite: a minimum GPA of 3.0. Formerly HUEN 3100.
  • ENES 3843 - Special Topics
    Primary Instructor - Fall 2020
    Explores different important themes in the humanities, check with department for specific semester topics. May be repeated up to 6 total credit hours. Formerly HUEN 3843.
  • HUEN 1010 - Humanities for Engineers
    Primary Instructor - Spring 2018 / Fall 2018 / Spring 2019 / Fall 2019
  • HUEN 2210 - Engineering, Science, and Society
    Primary Instructor - Fall 2019
    Explores challenges that engineering and science pose for society plus the ways that societies shape or impede science and engineering. Case studies range from contemporary issues (global warming, nuclear weapons, and genetic engineering) to classic cases (the execution of Socrates). Core texts in the Western Tradition supplement contemporary articles and films. Formerly HUEN 2210.
  • HUEN 3100 - Advanced Humanities for Engineers
    Primary Instructor - Spring 2018 / Summer 2018 / Fall 2018 / Spring 2019 / Spring 2020 / Summer 2020
  • HUEN 3700 - Culture Wars in Rome
    Primary Instructor - Summer 2018 / Summer 2019
    Investigates in Rome, Italy (during Maymester), the cultural contrasts among three different cities: ancient, pagan, aristocratic Rome; medieval, Christian, theocratic Rome; and modern, secular, democratic Rome. Draws on evidence from Roman literature, politics, art and architecture. Must have completed a minimum of 26 credit hours by start of course. Requires some preparatory work in Boulder. Formerly HUEN 3700.
  • HUEN 3843 - Special Topics
    Primary Instructor - Fall 2018 / Fall 2019 / Spring 2020

Background

International Activities

global connections related to teaching and scholarly work (in recent years)

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